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E2157. Multimodality Approach in Evaluation of Vascular Pathologies in Female Pelvis
Authors
  1. Margarita Revzin; Yale School of Medicine
  2. Douglas Katz; Winthrop-University Hospital
  3. Mariam Moshiri; University of Washington
  4. Christine Menias; Mayo Clinic Arizona
Background
There are a variety of vascular pathologies that can be encountered in the female pelvis. Knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology as well as available imaging modalities and their limitations are paramount for their correct interpretation. In this exhibit we will discuss characteristic imaging appearance of various pelvic vascular pathologies, including: a. Arterial: pelvic aneurysm (true and mycotic), pseudoaneurysm, AV fistula, dissection, proximal lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD) due to stenosis, occlusion, arterial rupture with and without active extravasation b. Small vessel and Capillary: Uterine AVM/AVF, pelvic AVM/AVF, rectus abdominis hemorrhage, bladder hemorrhage, hemoperitoneum, retained products of conception, placental insertion abnormality c. Venous: May-Thurner syndrome, Phlegmasia Cerulean Dolens, ovarian vein thrombosis, pelvic congestion syndrome, deep pelvic vein thrombosis, labial varices, round ligament varices We also develop an algorithm of management of various vascular pathologies in the female pelvis.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
Teaching Points 1. Familiarize radiologists with arterial and venous anatomy of female pelvis 2. Review role of imaging in evaluation of vascular pathologies in pelvis 3. Discuss characteristic appearance of various vascular pelvic pathologies 4. Provide an algorithmic approach to management of the pelvic vascular disease

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Vascular pelvic pathologies, including congenital and acquired aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, arterial stenosis, extravasation and dissection; AVM and AVF formation, and venous abnormalities (thrombosis, venous insufficiency) in the female pelvis

Conclusion
Knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology as well as available imaging modalities and their limitations and key imaging characteristics of various vascular pathologies that can be encountered in a female pelvis are paramount for their correct interpretation.