Abstracts

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E2049. Anatomic Review and Localization of Inguinal and Femoral Hernias with Discussion of Sports Hernias Utilizing Ultrasound and MRI Correlation
Authors
  1. Sean Hostmeyer; Henry Ford Hospital
  2. Chad Klochko; Henry Ford Hospital
  3. Marnix Van Holsbeeck; Henry Ford Hospital
Background
Inguinal and femoral hernias are a common source of groin mass and pain. Evaluation for these hernias using ultrasound is an effective method for diagnosis. This exhibit showcases the normal anatomical appearance of this region and the appearance of these hernias on ultrasound, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for correlation where available, as well as ultrasound techniques and tips for localization of inguinal and femoral hernias.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
Overview of normal structure and sonographic appearance of inguinal and femoral hernias. Overview of ultrasound techniques and tips for localization of inguinal and femoral hernias. Describe the imaging location and appearance of the hernias with MRI correlation when available. Discussion of sports hernias and possible imaging appearances.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Review of normal anatomic appearance of indirect and direct inguinal hernias; using MSK ultrasound with MRI correlation to show the structure and appearance as well as differentiating nerve from surrounding muscle/tendon. Review of anatomic position and probe placement to best visualize these hernias. Sonographic imaging appearance of these hernias with MRI correlation for better anatomic visualization. Discussion of sports hernias regarding presentation and management with ultrasound and MRI correlation.

Conclusion
Inguinal and femoral hernias are a common source of groin mass and pain. This exhibit showcases the normal anatomical appearance of this region and the appearance of these hernias on ultrasound, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for correlation where available, as well as ultrasound techniques and tips for localization of inguinal and femoral hernias.