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E2043. Congenital Bronchopulmonary Foregut Malformations: A Spectrum
Authors
  1. Hiral Banker; Le Bonheur Children's Hospital/University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  2. Preet kiran Sandhu; Le Bonheur Children's Hospital/University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  3. Vijetha Maller; Le Bonheur Children's Hospital/University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Background
Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations can be described as a continuum ranging from parenchymal anomalies (e.g. CPAM) to combined parenchymal and vascular anomalies (e.g. pulmonary sequestration and scimitar syndrome), and vascular anomalies with normal lung parenchyma (e.g. pulmonary sling). These lesions involve variable airway and foregut components. Though commonly seen in the chest they can be seen in ectopic locations such as extra lobar CPAM in the left suprarenal area. Additionally, other organ system malformations can be associated and should be evaluated.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
This exhibit will describe and illustrate postnatal imaging characteristics of various congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations including congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), bronchial atresia, congenital lobar overinflation, bronchogenic cysts, pulmonary sequestration, scimitar syndrome, etc. We will discuss antenatal US and MR imaging of various anomalies. The exhibit also includes an illustration of 3D CT reconstruction of some of these anomalies.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations include developmental abnormalities of foregut derivatives, pulmonary airway, and vascular components. The type of abnormality depends on its embryonic stage of development. Antenatal ultrasound or MRI can identify the abnormality. Postnatally, it can be identified with a radiograph or CT scan thorax with contrast. MRI is sometimes useful for the diagnosis.

Conclusion
Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations include anomalies of the lung parenchyma, vasculature, or combination of both. Understanding various imaging findings and systematic and thorough evaluation is essential for patient care. Computed tomography (CT) along with volumetric 3D reconstructions add an extra aid for further characterization and preoperative evaluation of surgical lesions.