Abstracts

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E2003. Lumps, Bumps and Swelling: Imaging Review of Soft Tissue Lesions, Complications and Treatment Implications
Authors
  1. Gregory Brody; Atlantic Health System
  2. Nirmaan Dayal; Atlantic Health System
  3. Frank Chen ; Atlantic Health System
  4. Michelle McBride; Atlantic Health System
Background
Soft tissue lesions are common entities, frequently encountered by a radiologist in their daily practice. Appropriately characterizing these lesions is essential for accurate diagnosis as well as for avoiding unnecessary procedures such as biopsy or excision of benign lesions. The radiologist's role here is essential for improving outcomes for our patients.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
Discuss clinical presentation and epidemiology of various soft tissue lesions, both benign and malignant. Demonstrate relevant anatomy and imaging characteristics differentiating lesions. Recognizing potential complications and treatment implications of various lesions.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Topics for discussion and review of original images for each specific topic include: -Clinical presentation and epidemiology specific to multiple soft lesions. -Imaging findings and pitfalls across multiple modalities including radiographs, mammography, CT, and MR. -Potential complications and treatment options/implications. -Specific topics with original images include: -Elastofibroma -Plantar fibroma -Tumoral calcinosis -Myositis ossificans -Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis -Morton’s neuroma -Glomus tumor -Peripheral nerve sheath tumor -Hemangioma/vascular malformations -Fat necrosis -Liposarcoma -Synovial sarcoma

Conclusion
The overall category of soft tissue lesions comprises a wide variety of differentials and consideration of these differentials is an essential component of musculoskeletal radiology. Recognizing the complications and treatment implications of these lesions improves our utility to the clinicians. Our role as a consultant also necessitates that imaging findings be communicated in the most clinically relevant way to ensure effective evaluation if needed.