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E1921. Sonographic Findings of Extremity Lesions
Authors
  1. Havisha Munjal; University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
  2. Daniel Howard; University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Imaging Sciences
  3. Anisha Shetty; University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
  4. Akshaar Brahmbhatt; University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Imaging Sciences
  5. Vikram Dogra; University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Imaging Sciences
Background
Soft tissue masses are commonly encountered during the evaluation of the extremities. These masses commonly present as painless lumps or are incidentally noted. Although the majority are benign, the variety and variability of these lesions can present a diagnostic dilemma. Sonographic evaluation is usually the first modality used to evaluate these lesions due to its convenience, cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. As a result, radiologists should be well versed in common, uncommon, and mimics of lesions during sonographic evaluation.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
This review explores essential considerations when evaluating soft tissue lesions of the extremities with ultrasound. This review will include an imaging-based diagnostic framework for evaluating extremity lesions. This decision paradigm will provide a practical approach that radiologists can follow to help inform sonographic evaluation and narrow differential diagnoses.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Multiple example cases including benign solid lesions (e.g. lipoma, fibromas, myxoma, pericytoma, osteochondroma, etc), solid malignant lesions (e.g. sarcoma, kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas, etc.) benign cystic lesions (e.g. schwannoma, ganglion cyst, lymphangioma, vascular malformation, hematoma, etc.), malignant cystic lesions (e.g. synovial sarcoma, metastasis, etc.), infiltrative lesions (i.e. lymphoma, heterogenous lesions, pseudolesions, and mimics among others will be included.

Conclusion
Relevant histopathologic correlation associated with characteristic sonographic findings of soft tissue masses within the extremities along with additional imaging and important prognostic considerations will be discussed.