Abstracts

RETURN TO ABSTRACT LISTING


E1899. Master Those Calcifications: Imaging Review of Pathologic and Physiologic Intracranial Calcifications
Authors
  1. Sean Mendonca; Morristown Medical Center
  2. Michelle McBride; Morristown Medical Center; Overlook Medical Center
  3. Frank Chen; Morristown Medical Center; Overlook Medical Center
  4. Nirmaan Dayal; Morristown Medical Center; Overlook Medical Center
  5. Lawrence Wang; Morristown Medical Center; Overlook Medical Center
  6. Gerard Reddy; Morristown Medical Center
Background
Physiologic calcifications of the brain are frequently seen on CT and have been associated with increasing age. Common locations of physiologic calcifications include the basal ganglia, pineal gland, falx cerebri, choroid plexus, and cerebellum. There are, however, many pathological conditions involving the brain that are associated with intracranial calcifications. It is important that the radiologist recognize the distribution patterns and features of intracranial calcifications associated with pathologic conditions. This educational exhibit reviews the imaging findings among a variety of neurological disorders associated with intracranial calcifications, as well as common locations of physiologic calcifications.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
• Describe various types of physiologic intracranial calcifications seen on non-contrast CT examinations of the head. • Review the distinguishing features and distribution of intracranial calcifications associated with pathological conditions. • Discuss the epidemiology, etiology, radiographic features, and prognosis of various neurologic diseases associated with intracranial calcifications.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
This educational exhibit will review imaging features of benign physiologic intracranial calcifications, as well as intracranial calcifications seen in a variety of disease processes. Specific pathological conditions that will be reviewed include Sturge-Weber syndrome, Fahr’s Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis, Neurofibromatosis Type II, Basal Cell Nevus syndrome, intracranial tumors, and various metabolic and endocrine disorders. The etiology, clinical presentation, radiographic features, and treatment of each disease entity are reviewed.

Conclusion
Intracranial calcifications are a commonly encountered finding on CT examinations. We will provide radiologists and clinicians with the key imaging findings of physiologic intracranial calcifications, as well as intracranial calcifications in specific pathological conditions. It is important for the radiologist to recognize and differentiate intracranial calcifications to accurately identify underlying pathology in the brain.