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E1834. Osteochondrosis: A Skeletal Survey
Authors
  1. Chad Downing; Mather Hospital; Stony Brook University
  2. Marcello Scotti; Mather Hospital; Stony Brook University
  3. Jasmine Kang; Mather Hospital; Stony Brook University
  4. Mathew Hensley; Mather Hospital; Stony Brook University
  5. Islam Fayed; Mather Hospital; Stony Brook University
  6. Daichi Hayashi; Stony Brook University
Background
Osteochondrosis is a group of heterogeneous disorders characterized by interrupted bone development in skeletally immature patients related to disrupted epiphyseal blood supply. Although many of these disorders are associated with avascular necrosis, most of these conditions are now believed to be related to trauma. Management of osteochondrosis depends primarily on the severity of involvement of the subchondral bone and/or articular cartilage, with both operative and nonoperative treatment strategies commonly employed. Radiologists should be familiar with the general appearance of osteochondroses, common locations, and eponymous associations for each.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
i. Understand proposed mechanisms and epidemiology of osteochondroses. ii. Describe general radiographic and magnetic resonance appearance for osteochondrosis. iii. Review imaging of well-described osteochondroses and their locations, including Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee, osteochondral lesion of the talus, Kienbock disease, Kohler disease, Panner disease, Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disase, Freiberg infraction, Sever disease, little league elbow, Blount disease, and Madelung deformity.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
i. Review radiographic appearance for each of the above osteochondroses. ii. Detail MRI appearance for selected cases. iii. Understand pertinent clinical features for each example, including age, symptoms, treatment, and prognosis.

Conclusion
Osteochondrosis is characterized by a diverse group of seemingly unrelated pathologies, however, current understanding suggests trauma as a common pathway for these entities. Although many of these conditions are associated with avascular necrosis, this is not felt to be an inciting factor in the pathophysiology. By definition, these conditions affect children and adolescents, as the epiphyseal region is the site of pathology. Preserving the articular surface is the goal of treatment, with both operative and nonoperative approaches common depending on severity of involvement and other clinical factors. Radiologists should be familiar with the radiographic appearance for osteochondrosis, locations commonly affected, and their eponyms.