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E1820. Postmortem CT in COVID-19
Authors
  1. Mariam Thomas; Olive View-University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  2. Fereidoun Abtin; University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  3. Antoinette Roth; Olive View-University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  4. Catherine Yim; Olive View-University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  5. Anokh Pahwa; Olive View-University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  6. Jeremy Paige; Olive View-University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center; University of California - Los Angeles Medical Center
  7. Odey Ukpo; Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner
Background
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has produced a global pandemic with mounting mortality in the United States. There is a need for more information on this disease and robust research. However, as autopsies are not routinely performed on this disease, postmortem CT may be a useful alternative to provide valuable information. The purpose of this exhibit is to review the postmortem CT findings in over 30 deceased who had died with COVID-19.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
Review the spectrum of findings seen on postmortem CT in COVID-19. Brief review of how postmortem CT is routinely performed. Review the benefits of postmortem CT in COVID-19 and some pitfalls to be careful of.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
This exhibit reviews the postmortem CT findings with reference to our cohort of over 30 deceased who were positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by real time reverse transcriptase of nasopharyngeal swabs and also had a postmortem CT exam. This exhibit will review how the postmortem CT exam was performed and review the typical pulmonary findings seen on the postmortem CT in the deceased who died from COVID-19. The exhibit will review in a case presentation format typical cases of postmortem CT in COVID-19 but also review cases in which the deceased had a positive SARS-CoV-2 test but the postmortem CT findings showed that the cause of death was due to other pathology and the SARS-Co-V-2 may have been merely coincidental.

Conclusion
Postmortem CT is a valuable tool that enables the forensic pathologist to visualize the anatomy in the deceased without dissecting the body. PMCT can help identify mechanism and cause of death for many conditions and may be useful in COVID-19. The presence of the characteristic pulmonary findings seen on the postmortem CT in COVID-19 may suggest death attributed to COVID-19 and the absence of such findings may suggest the immediate cause of death was due to an alternative pathology.