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E1716. An Analysis of Enrollment and Utilization Trends of an Online Patient Portal
Authors
  1. James McFarland; University of Alabama at Birmingham
  2. Andrew Gunn; University of Alabama at Birmingham
  3. Grant Smith; University of Alabama at Birmingham
  4. Yufeng Li; University of Alabama at Birmingham
  5. Desiree Morgan; University of Alabama at Birmingham
Objective:
Little is known about patient engagement with online portals, especially as it relates to radiology reports. The purpose of this study is to identify enrollment and utilization trends for an online patient portal within a large university health system.

Materials and Methods:
Portal enrollment and utilization data over a three-year period was collected, including engagement with the radiology and laboratory work tabs. Engagement with the laboratory work tab was used as a benchmark with which to compare engagement with the radiology work tab. Patient information such as age, gender, race, primary language, household income, home zip code, level of education, and hospital utilization patterns was recorded. Differences in these variables between groups were compared by a Student’s t-test or Fisher’s exact test, as appropriate. A regression analysis was performed to assess if any of the variables were associated with radiology work tab engagement.

Results:
33% of patients (n=138,783; M: 49,210, F: 89,571; median age: 50) were enrolled in the portal. Compared to unenrolled patients, enrolled patients were older, had a higher median household income, had more outpatient clinic visits, and fewer emergency department visits (all p values <0.0001). Enrolled patients had a higher proportion of Caucasians, females, patients with advanced education, and patients with insurance (all p values <0.0001). Of enrolled patients who had a radiology exam performed, 23% (n=15,162) viewed the results within the portal. Comparatively, 47% of enrolled patients (n=39,979) who had a laboratory test performed viewed the results within the portal. Of enrolled patients, females were more likely to engage with the radiology work tab (OR=1.293, 95%CI 1.23-1.36) while African-Americans (OR=0.88, 95%CI 0.82-0.94) and patients with lower incomes (OR=0.992, 95%CI 0.989-0.996) were less likely to engage with the radiology work tab.

Conclusion:
Overall, enrollment in the portal is low but correlates with certain demographic and socioeconomic trends. Engagement with radiology reports within the portal is less than engagement with laboratory results, especially among males and those with lower household incomes. Clinical Relevance: Opportunities exist for radiologists to improve patient enrollment in and engagement with online portals.