Abstracts

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E1707. Benign Tumors and Tumor-Like Conditions Affecting the Hoffa's Fat Pad
Authors
  1. Pankaj Nepal; St. Vincent's Medical Center
  2. Vijayanadh Ojili; University of Texas Health
  3. Joshua Sapire; St. Vincent's Medical Center
  4. Syed Alam; Hamad Medical Corporation
Background
The Hoffa fat pad is interposed between the joint capsule and the synovium. It is richly innervated and, therefore, one of the sources of anterior knee pain. The existence of pluripotent cells in Hoffa fat pad can differentiate into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Hoffa fat pad pathologies are unique and have some specific and some non-specific appearances. The disorders are related to traumas, involvement from adjacent disorders and masses. It is important for radiologists to be aware of different pathologies affecting Hoffa fat pad, some of which may be asymptomatic and detected on MRI.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
To understand basic anatomy of the Hoffa’s fat pad, and its major functions related to mechanical support of the knee. To discuss adjacent capsular/synovial /articular structures related to various pathologies. Role of different imaging modalities such as MRI, plain radiographs, and ultrasound. To describe imaging features of common tumors, scars, ganglion cysts, and other tumor like conditions as listed on table of contents. Brief description and examples of Hoffa's fat pad edema related to impingement.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Hoffa fat pad benign tumors: soft tissue Chondroma, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis (PVNS) Malignant tumors: synovial sarcoma Hoffa's fat pad ganglion cyst, Hoffa's fat pad scar, Infrapatellar plica syndrome, Synovial osteochondromatosis, nodular synovitis Pseudo mass: Idiopathic hoffacitis, Hoffa fat pad impingement (brief). Modalities: MRI, ultrasound, CT and radiographs.

Conclusion
It is important for radiologists to be aware of different pathologies affecting Hoffa fat pad, some of which may be asymptomatic and detected on MRI.