Abstracts

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E1628. Uncommon Benign Breast Lesions: Case-Based Imaging Review, Rad-Path Correlation and Implications in Management
Authors
  1. Minu Agarwal; CIBC Breast Assessment Centre, Juravinski Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences; McMaster University
  2. Amar Udare; McMaster University
  3. Kavita Dhamanaskar; CIBC Breast Assessment Centre, Juravinski Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences; McMaster University
  4. Karen Finlay; CIBC Breast Assessment Centre, Juravinski Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences; McMaster University
  5. Phillip Williams; McMaster University
  6. Meredith Lynch; CIBC Breast Assessment Centre, Juravinski Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences; McMaster University
Background
Few benign and inflammatory conditions of the breast have imaging features that mimic malignancy and warrant biopsy. These lesions are less commonly seen and can present a diagnostic challenge. Radiologists need to be aware of these benign lesions as differential diagnosis for malignant appearing lesions. When an unusual benign lesion is encountered on pathology, familiarity with imaging features on various breast imaging modalities will help determine radio-pathological concordance and the next step in management.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
After review of this exhibit, participants will be able to identify multimodality imaging findings of uncommon benign breast lesions that mimic malignancy, correlate imaging with histopathological features of these less common breast lesions and describe the critical role of radio-pathological correlation and lessons learned from management of these atypical cases.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
In this exhibit, we will present the multimodality imaging findings and key pathology features of various inflammatory conditions, proliferative diseases, benign tumours and other rare benign conditions of the breast which present with suspicious imaging features warranting biopsy. In discordant cases, choosing the next best step between short-term follow-up, repeat biopsy or evaluation with MRI depends on a multitude of factors including patient risk factors, initial suspicion on imaging and satisfaction with initial sampling.

Conclusion
Knowledge of benign mimics of breast carcinoma is important as part of differential diagnosis to assist in appropriate radio-pathological correlation and help guide patient management.