Abstracts

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E1515. Multimodality Imaging Review of the Malignant Epithelial and Non-Epithelial Tumors in the Adult Kidney
Authors
  1. Dhakshinamoorthy Ganeshan; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  2. Nicolaus Wagner-Bartak; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  3. Vincenzo Wong; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  4. Sarah Palmquist; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  5. Juan Ibarra Rovira; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  6. Catherine Devine; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Background
Although clear cell Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are the most common primary adult renal malignancy, there are numerous other histological subtypes of RCC including papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC, collecting duct RCC, renal medullary carcinoma, sarcomatoid RCC and Unclassified RCC. Furthermore, there are various non-epithelial malignant tumors affecting the kidney such as sarcomas (leiomyosarcoma, angiosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, synovial sarcoma & Ewing sarcoma), mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, neuroendocrine tumors and renal hematopoietic neoplasms (lymphoma and leukemia). Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of these tumors. The purpose of this educational exhibit is to describe the imaging spectrum of the various malignant epithelial and non-epithelial tumors in the adult kidney

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
Review multimodality imaging spectrum of epithelial and non-epithelial renal malignancies and highlight imaging findings to narrow differential diagnoses.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
Role of imaging in histological subtyping of renal tumors based on features such as the morphology of the mass (solid versus cystic; bean-type versus ball type), presence of fat, calcification, necrosis, degree of enhancement of the tumor, pattern of enhancement such as early hypervascular enhancement and washout versus persistent enhancement, presence of tumor thrombus in the renal vein and inferior vena cava and pattern of nodal and distant metastases.

Conclusion
Imaging plays a critical role in the detection and characterization of renal malignancies. Radiologists should be aware of typical and atypical features of the various epithelial and non-epithelial renal malignancies.