Abstracts

RETURN TO ABSTRACT LISTING


2255. Percutaneous Retrieval of Intravascular Foreign Body: Single Centre Experience
Authors * Denotes Presenting Author
  1. Vineel Inampudi *; Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences
Objective:
Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences is a tertiary care oncology center with majority of patients requiring placement of long term intravascular ports. Dislodgement or migration of the catheters have been encountered following long term usage/flow at high pressure. We present our experience of 390 cases of dislodged / migrated intravascular catheters in various locations.

Materials and Methods:
A prospective review of 390 patients (age ranging from 8 months to 67 years) with dislodged / migrated intravascular catheters referred to department of Interventional Radiology for percutaneous retrieval between March 2014 to March 2020. The procedure was performed using GE INNOVA 41001Q in Cathlab.

Results:
The catheter was dislodged into the Inferior Vena Cava(IVC) in 180 (46.1%) cases, catheter was seen in the Right Atrium extending into right ventricle in 60 (15.3%) cases, Pulmonary Artery extending to Right Hepatic vein in 45 (11.5%) cases, Superior Vena Cava (SVC) extending to Right atrium, IVC and proximal right hepatic vein in 37 (9.6%) cases, Right Internal Jugular Vein extending to SVC and Right Atrium in 29 (7.5%) cases, Right Atrium extending to IVC in 21 (5.4%) cases and Right Ventricle in 18 (4.6%) cases. The mechanism of endovascular loss was device fracture in 60 (15.3%) cases and migration in 330 (84.6%) cases. Snare was used to remove the Intravascular Foreign Body (IVFB) in 120 (30.7%) cases and a combination of pigtail catheter, snare in 270 (69.2%) cases. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases. There were no immediate complications related to the retrieval of the IVFB.

Conclusion:
Percutaneous Retrieval of Intravascular Foreign bodies is a minimal invasive and better alternative to surgery due to its high success rate and minimal morbidity.