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1652. Implementation of a Custom Made, Digital Dashboard in a Radiology Department: Evaluation of Workflow Changes and User Satisfaction
Authors * Denotes Presenting Author
  1. Cornelia Dewald *; Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical School Hannover
  2. Lena Becker; Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical School Hannover
  3. Stefanie Huebner; Faculty of Economics and Management Leibniz University Hannover
  4. Alice Schneider; Faculty of Economics and Management Leibniz University Hannover
  5. Frank Wacker; Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical School Hannover
  6. Hans-Juergen Raatschen; Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical School Hannover
  7. Bennet Hensen; Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical School Hannover
Objective:
Process- and workflow management plays a leading role in terms of efficiency improvement in hospitals. We implemented a custom made, digital dashboard in the CT section of a university hospital in order to create an intuitive, transparent and paper free workflow. The dashboard interfaces the existing IT systems and thus provides relevant data of all patients planned for and during CT in a structured real time overview. Aim of this study was to analyze work flow changes by time measurements and to assess user satisfaction after introduction of the dashboard software compared to before.

Materials and Methods:
We prospectively assessed the workflow before and after introduction of the dashboard in two observational periods between 11/2018 and 07/2019. Three subprocesses were defined and quantified via time measurements: preparations prior to arrival of the patient (subprocess 1: determination of indication and exam protocol), work steps just before the CT exam (subprocess 2: consent discussion, exclusion of contraindications, peroral intake of negative or positive contrast agent (for approx. 30 min) and intravenous (IV) cannulation) and after the CT scan (subprocess 3: image quality control, removing IV cannula 30 min after CT). In total 1322 separate subprocesses were analyzed independently (vertical analysis). Furthermore, the successive subprocesses of 116 patients receiving CT were continuously recorded and compared each before and after implementation of the dashboard (horizontal analysis). In order to determine user satisfaction, written staff surveys (n=14) were performed to grade the dashboard (1 to 5; poor to very good).

Results:
Analysis of the continuously recorded workflows (horizontal analysis) presented a trend for decreased patient processing time after implementation of the dashboard compared to before (71±39min to 66±36min; -7%; p>.05). Mean values decreased in subprocess 1 (2±2min to 1±1min; -50%; p<.05) and subprocess 2 (43±31min to 39±24min; -9.3%; p>.05), whereas they increased in subprocess 3 (24±17min to 27±36min; +12.5%; p>.05). Assessment of the separately measured subprocesses (vertical analysis) presented comparable results. The staff surveys implied a high satisfaction after implementation of the dashboard (average score: 4.9). Advanced general overview and improved workflow organization were rated as the most relevant features.

Conclusion:
Time analysis of the workflow processes in a CT department after introduction of a digital real time dashboard led to an overall shortened patient processing time. Furthermore, implementation of the dashboard induced a high user satisfaction. The dashboard software has the potential to facilitate an improved overview of all patients planned for and during CT, refines workflow organization and thus promotes patient safety.