ARRS 2022 Abstracts

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E1768. Approach to Fat-Containing Lesions in the Peritoneum and Retroperitoneum
Authors
  1. Kevin Junus; Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
  2. Ruskin Cua; Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
  3. Brittany Kazmierski; Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
  4. Miriam Romero; Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
Background
Fat-containing lesions are often incidentally detected on imaging. Management of these lesions will vary depending on the etiology. Some fat-containing lesions, such as retroperitoneal liposarcomas, require surgical consultation for resection, whereas benign lesions like renal angiomyolipomas can be observed until they become symptomatic or reach a certain size. Familiarity with the spectrum of benign and malignant fat-containing lesions and their appearance across multiple modalities will help the radiologist recognize and accurately diagnose these entities.

Educational Goals / Teaching Points
The goals of this exhibit are to review both common and rare fat-containing lesions within the peritoneum and retroperitoneum using a case-based format; learn a systematic approach for assessing fat-containing lesions in the peritoneum and retroperitoneum to create and narrow the differential diagnosis; and review multimodality techniques to evaluate lipid characteristics, focusing on CT and MRI.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques
This educational exhibit is targeted toward trainees and radiologists in practice. It will provide a multimodality review of both common and rare peritoneal and retroperitoneal lesions. Fat-containing lesions will be presented in an organ-based review of cases (e.g., liver, gastrointestinal tract, adrenal glands, kidneys, pelvic organs, retroperitoneal space).

Conclusion
Many fat-containing masses in the peritoneum and retroperitoneum are incidentally detected. Accurate diagnosis of these lesions is crucial for appropriate referral for clinical or surgical management.