ARRS 2022 Abstracts

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E1397. COVID-19 Infection Impact on an Inner-City Lung Cancer Screening Cohort: A 16-Month Experience
Authors
  1. Ali Farhat; Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  2. Elliot Shulman; Montefiore Medical Center
  3. Maximilian Stahl; Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  4. Edward Mardakhaev; Montefiore Medical Center
  5. Kapil Wattamwar; Montefiore Medical Center
  6. Maria Serrano; Montefiore Medical Center
  7. Linda Haramati; Montefiore Medical Center
Objective:
The COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately affected inhabitants of underserved communities. Our lung cancer screening program serves a diverse, impoverished inner-city population. The present study evaluates the impact of COVID-19 infection in this cohort.

Materials and Methods:
Retrospective chart review for COVID-19 infection (positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR, positive antibody test, documented infection in EMR), hospitalization and mortality between March 2020 and June 2021 was performed. Initial 3-month data were presented at ARRS 2021. Demographics and comorbidities were noted. Bivariate analysis was performed, with a significance level of p < 0.05.

Results:
A total of 2537 patients were included in the study; the mean age was 68 ± 6 years and 50.6% (1284/2537) of patients were women. Among participants, 36.6% (928/2537) were Hispanic, 26.6% (676/2537) were non-Hispanic Black,19.8% (503/2537) were Non-Hispanic White, and 16.9% (430/2537) were other/multiple races. COVID-19 infection developed in 9.1% (231/2537) of the cohort. There was no difference in the mean age of infected patients compared to non-infected patients (p = .92). Of the 231 patients with COVID-19, hospitalization was required for 32.0% (74/231) and mortality was 6.9% (16/231). Patients who died had significantly higher rates of diabetes (68.8% vs. 39.1%, p = .03), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (50.0% vs. 18.1%, p = .006), and congestive heart failure (CHF) (31.3% vs. 10.7%, p = .03) compared to those who survived. Additionally, patients infected with COVID-19 who were hospitalized were older (70 ± 6 vs. 67 ± 6, p < .005) and had significantly higher rates of comorbidities including hypertension (87.8% vs. 68.8%, p < .005), CKD (33.8% vs. 14.0%, p < .005), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (78.4% vs. 52.2%, p < .005), CHF (28.4% vs 4.5%, p < .005), history of myocardial infarction (20.3% vs. 5.7%, p < .005), and malignancy (28.4% vs. 14.6%, p = .019).

Conclusion:
Approximately 9% of our diverse inner-city lung cancer screening cohort developed COVID-19 during the first 16 months of the pandemic. Nearly one-third of infected patients were hospitalized, and mortality was 6.9% among infected patients. Mortality and hospitalization were significantly associated with multiple comorbidities.