ARRS 2022 Abstracts

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1703. Trending: Resident-Run Social Media as a Tool for Program Recruitment
Authors * Denotes Presenting Author
  1. Charles Li *; Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
  2. Andrew Chong; Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
  3. Timothy Iafe; Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
  4. M. Victoria Marx; Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
  5. Miriam Romero; Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
Objective:
Social media (SoMe) and residency program websites are becoming increasingly commonplace as a source of information for potential residency applicants. Survey data from the Pew Research Center found that in 2019, 72% of American adults engaged with at least one social media platform. Koontz et al. recently reported a significantly higher rate of SoMe utilization among radiologists (83%) compared to the general adult population in the United States (65%), and that the utilization rate among radiology trainees is even higher (91%), suggesting that SoMe is particularly well-positioned for the recruitment and education of young trainees. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Association of Program Directors in Radiology/Interventional Radiology (APDR/APDIR) released a joint statement recommending that all programs commit to online interviews and virtual visits for the 2020-2021 residency recruitment cycle. Without the in-person interview experience, a program’s online SoMe and internet presence have become increasingly important. The primary purpose of this quality improvement project was to create, host, and manage a resident-run program website and social media presence. Additionally, we describe the secondary outcomes of improved applicant interest in our program and resident engagement with the recruitment process.

Materials and Methods:
We surveyed applicants during the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 ACGME residency selection cycles to evaluate the impact of our project on applicant recruitment. To our knowledge, this is the first study detailing the creation of an independent, resident-run online media presence and its impact on applicant recruitment.

Results:
Of the 77 applicants who interviewed in the 2019-2020 cycle, 48 applicants completed the survey. Thirty-nine respondents (81%) were aware of our website prior to their interview date, and 40/41 applicants (98%) who ultimately viewed the site indicated that it was “useful”. Thirty-seven of 45 respondents (82%) indicated that the website positively impacted their view of our program. Similarly, amongst applicants who interviewed in the 2020-2021 cycle, 53 applicants completed the survey. 86% of respondents indicated that the website was useful and 83% of respondents indicated that the website positively impacted their view of the program. Notably, there was a statistically significant increase in awareness of our Twitter account in the 20-21 application cycle (70% of applicants compared to 31% in the prior year).

Conclusion:
We conclude that a resident-run social media presence and online campaign positively impact an applicant’s perception of our program and increases engagement of residents within the program. With the changing landscape of residency applications and an emphasis on virtual interviews, these types of online engagement platforms will become increasingly important for ensuring the recruitment of exceptional candidates for the next generation of radiologists.