ARRS 2022 Abstracts

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1383. A Multi-State Review: Tips and Tricks From 600 Image-Guided Biopsy With Same Day Wire-Free SCOUT Localization of Breast and Axillary Lesions
Authors * Denotes Presenting Author
  1. Simarsukh Dhillon *; Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Florida Atlantic University
  2. Nikita Rao; Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Florida Atlantic University
  3. Samantha Matott; Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Florida Atlantic University
  4. Stephanie Salgueiro; Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Florida Atlantic University
  5. Mary Hayes; Memorial Regional Hospital Department of Radiology
Objective:
For patients who present with a suspicious breast or axillary lymph node findings that are known or strongly predicted to require both needle biopsy (Bx) and localization (Loc) to guide surgery, a same-day biopsy and SCOUT localization (Bx-Loc) provides an option for enhanced clinical planning involving the healthcare team and decreases reductant downstream needle procedures of the same lesion. The SCOUT serves as both a biopsy tissue clip marker and a wire-free localization device. We present clinical tips and tricks learned from over 600 patients with suspicious breast or axillary lesions who underwent same-day Bx-Loc of lesions in three unique healthcare systems in Florida, Utah, and Illinois.

Materials and Methods:
This study is an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective review patients with of breast cancer who had same-day image-guided biopsy and SCOUT placement for suspicious breast or axillary lesions. Ten cases were selected from the over 600 same-day Bx-Loc procedures from our Florida, Utah, and Illinois database to highlight tips on patient body habitus, lesion location, hematomas, response to neoadjuvant therapies, and surveillance imaging (MRI and/or PET/CT).

Results:
This presentation will highlight tips and tricks for image-guided Bx-Loc in the breast and axilla via ultrasound, mammography (2D, stereotactic, 3D) and CT selected from a diverse cohort of over 600 patients, age 20-82 years, ultimately stage I-IV, including exceptional responders to neoadjuvant treatment, diagnostic and surveillance imaging (including MRI or PET/CT), and those for whom SCOUT was placed for a long duration, up to 604 days.

Conclusion:
For patients with breast or axillary lesions known or strongly predicted to require both needle biopsy and localization to guide surgery, a same-day Bx-Loc with SCOUT may serve a dual function as a tissue clip marker and wire-free localization. We share our tips and tricks from our clinical experience from over 600 cases in Florida, Utah, and Illinois which preserved surgical and oncoplastic treatment options, enhanced preoperative planning decisions by the patient and healthcare team, and decreased downstream redundant needle localization procedures of the same lesion.